STARRED REVIEW
December 2021

Gift-ready graphics for teens

Looking for something to please a choosy teen reader? Look no further than these gripping graphic tales.
STARRED REVIEW

Gift-ready graphics for teens

December 2021
Looking for something to please a choosy teen reader? Look no further than these gripping graphic tales.
STARRED REVIEW
December 2021

Gift-ready graphics for teens

December 2021
Looking for something to please a choosy teen reader? Look no further than these gripping graphic tales.
STARRED REVIEW
December 2021

Gift-ready graphics for teens

Looking for something to please a choosy teen reader? Look no further than these gripping graphic tales.
STARRED REVIEW
December 2021

Gift-ready graphics for teens

Looking for something to please a choosy teen reader? Look no further than these gripping graphic tales.
December 2021

Gift-ready graphics for teens

Looking for something to please a choosy teen reader? Look no further than these gripping graphic tales.
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Delight the teenager on your holiday list with a fabulous graphic novel or gripping true story guaranteed to make them swoon, giggle or gasp.

The Girl From the Sea

For the reader who longs to be carried away on the waves of a fantastical story

In The Girl From the Sea, author-illustrator Molly Knox Ostertag blends myth and realism to create a story about the things we'd rather keep submerged—and what happens when they surface with a splash.

Morgan Kwon is 15 and part of a power clique at her high school that serves as a frothy diversion from her unhappy family life. She's just biding her time until she can move away from her small island town and finally come out as gay. 

One rainy night at the rocky seaside cliffs that are her favorite place to sit and think, Morgan slips on the wet stones and falls into the water. She's rescued by a mysterious girl named Keltie, who is kind of cute, really, and an awfully powerful swimmer, but the instant connection between them threatens all the secrets that Morgan's been carefully concealing from her friends and family. 

Ostertag (The Witch Boy) is an expert at conveying complex emotions and subtly shifting the mood from one panel to the next. Morgan is part of a group text message thread with her friends, which  includes numerous invitations that Morgan declines, at first because of her feelings of loneliness and depression, and later because Keltie is clearly not welcome among the group, even as she and Morgan are tentatively falling for each other. Ostertag initially depicts Morgan's home life with her stressed mom and angry little brother in stark, silent scenes, but as secrets come to light and Morgan's family reach out to one another, there's a warmth to their time together that lifts off the page.

This graphic novel's narrative flows so smoothly that you might find yourself reading it in one big gulp, and its resolution is bittersweet but hopeful. The Girl From the Sea is a wistful romance that will catch readers by the heart.

—Heather Seggel

Passport

For the reader who has always suspected there was more to their parents than meets the eye

"¿Qué está pasando?" Early in her graphic memoir, Passport, author-illustrator Sophia Glock writes that this phrase—which means "what is going on?"—is her mantra at the Spanish-language immersion high school she attends in Central America. The phrase is a lifeline as Glock navigates the usual challenges of teenage life, but it takes on another meaning when Glock discovers that she is the daughter of CIA agents who have been keeping her in the dark. 

Growing up, Glock lived all over the world because of her parents' ambiguous "work." What work is that, exactly? She has no idea. The more questions she asks, the fewer answers she receives. Just keep your head down, her parents tell her. Stay safe, and if you can, why don't you let us know what your friends' parents do for a living?

When Glock reads a letter that her older sister, away at college, wrote to their parents, the blanks in her life begin to fill in, though she is too afraid to confront her parents directly. Instead, like any frustrated teen, she exercises her autonomy and starts telling lies of her own. Boys, girls, drinking and partying abound while Glock travels through the gauntlet of adolescence and the tension between her ever-accumulating little lies versus her parents' one big lie threatens to boil over.

Glock's depictions of quiet yet consequential moments, such as when she ponders the choices her parents have made, are especially spellbinding. Her sparse, restrained art style evokes the feeling of a memory play, a recollection both real and ethereal. She renders the entire book in only three colors: shades of a reddish pink, a cold blue and white. Her characters aren't always easily distinguishable from one another, and while that can cause some confusion in the story, the overall effect is satisfying. After all, how much does Glock really know about the people around her? ¿Qué está pasando? In her author's note, Glock concedes as much. "These stories are as true as I remember them," she writes. The CIA's publication review board nixed some of the particulars of Passport before it was published, which makes the details that did end up in the book all the more dramatic.

A deceptively spare graphic novel chock-full of depth and beauty, Passport is an unusual coming-of-age memoir that's totally worth the trip. 

—Luis G. Rendon

★ The Dire Days of Willowweep Manor

For the reader who loves spooky castles and fears no gothic terror, not even marauding zombie bunnies

Haley is so exuberantly dedicated to gothic romances that her exasperated teacher orders her to stop writing book reports on Wuthering Heights (and no, she cannot do an interpretive dance about it instead!). After school, Haley sets out for home in the rain, and lo! As she stands on a bridge, dramatically sighing, she sees a man struggling in the dark waters below. She dives in to rescue the floundering fellow, conks out after her exertions and awakens abed in Willowweep Manor, attended by a dour housekeeper named Wilhelmina. Have Haley's period-piece dreams come true? 

Turns out, Haley has indeed been inadvertently catapulted into a world much like those in her beloved books. There's a castle (complete with "baleful catacombs" and an on-site ghost) and verdant moors, as well as three handsome brothers—stoic Laurence, brooding Montague and vacuous Cuthbert—who took her in after she saved Montague from drowning.

But Haley soon discovers another side to Willowweep. It's a gasket universe, a liminal space between Earth and an evil dimension laden with a substance called bile that destroys everything in its globby, neon green path. Can Haley help the brothers fend off the encroaching forces of darkness before it's too late? 

The Dire Days of Willowweep Manor is a hoot right from the get-go, but when everyone bands together to defend the manor, author Shaenon K. Garrity's tale becomes ever more hilarious and exciting. Humorous metafictional quips fly hither and yon as the characters take up arms, squabble over strategy and realize they've got to break a few rules (and defy a few tropes) if they want to prevail. 

Christopher Baldwin's art is full-bore appealing. He has an excellent command of color: Brooding browns underlie characters' stress while sky blues highlight Haley's growing confidence. Facial expressions are little comedies unto themselves, including horses who side-eye Cuthbert's silliness, and slack-faced bile-addled bunnies who adorably chant "Destroy." 

The Dire Days of Willowweep Manor celebrates and satirizes a beloved genre while encouraging readers to defy the rules and become the heroes of their own stories.

—Linda M. Castellitto

Find more 2021 gift recommendations from BookPage.

The Girl from the Sea
By Molly Knox Ostertag
Graphix

ISBN 9781338540574

The Dire Days of Willowweep Manor
By Christopher Baldwin, Shaenon K. Garrity
Margaret K. McElderry

ISBN 9781534460867

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