STARRED REVIEW
January 2020

The Hold List: Reading resolutions

What's your reading resolution? At BookPage, we're determined to knock these titles of our TBR in 2020.
STARRED REVIEW

The Hold List: Reading resolutions

January 2020
What's your reading resolution? At BookPage, we're determined to knock these titles of our TBR in 2020.
STARRED REVIEW
January 2020

The Hold List: Reading resolutions

January 2020
What's your reading resolution? At BookPage, we're determined to knock these titles of our TBR in 2020.
STARRED REVIEW
January 2020

The Hold List: Reading resolutions

What's your reading resolution? At BookPage, we're determined to knock these titles of our TBR in 2020.
STARRED REVIEW
January 2020

The Hold List: Reading resolutions

What's your reading resolution? At BookPage, we're determined to knock these titles of our TBR in 2020.
January 2020

The Hold List: Reading resolutions

What's your reading resolution? At BookPage, we're determined to knock these titles of our TBR in 2020.
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As you contemplate your New Year’s resolutions, don’t forget those books you’ve been meaning to read, or that you’re embarrassed to not have already read. At BookPage, we’ve vowed to make 2020 our best reading year yet.


Apeirogon by Colum McCann

Since this is a safe space and we’re all being honest, I have to admit that I avoid reading long books. Towering generational sagas, sweeping epics—I eschew them all in favor of weird little novels about dreamscapes and ghosts and anxieties. But my 2020 reading resolution is to find some hefty doorstoppers and dig in. First up, I’ve got my eye on Apeirogon, the new novel from Colum McCann, which publishes in late February. Its title refers to a shape with an infinite number of sides, and its story of two men in the Holy Land—one Palestinian, one Israeli—over the course of a single day is composed of so many parts as to seem infinite. It’s being called monumental, risky and daring—an experiment and a feat—and that’s the kind of book I’m ready to commit to. —Cat, Deputy Editor

The Complete Stories by Flannery O’Connor

Growing up in the South, Flannery O’Connor was widely lauded. We read her in school, we discussed her in our free time, we took a special liking to peacocks. So it was sort of easy, after all that, for me to go on pretending that I had read more than “A Good Man Is Hard to Find,” which Mrs. Jacobs assigned for my 10th-grade English class. Alas, it has all been a ruse. I’ve still never read a complete FOC story collection or novel—partly because I didn’t major in English in college, and partly because I usually prefer reading nonfiction. (Hello, it’s me, the nonfiction editor.) But this year, I’m ready to stop making excuses and start reading about sin, demonic pigs, violence, Catholicism and grace. —Christy, Associate Editor

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

To work at BookPage is to be constantly accruing reading resolutions. One of my overarching goals has been to rectify some of my literary blind spots, especially in the genres I cover. For sci-fi and fantasy, that has led me to the works of Ursula K. Le Guin and The Silmarillion (thus achieving eternal nerd bragging rights). However, it’s time to pivot to more recent masterpieces, and I’m starting with acclaimed fantasy superstar N.K. Jemisin. First up? The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, Jemisin’s sensational debut novel and the start of her Inheritance Trilogy. A murder mystery, political drama and epic fantasy saga rolled into one, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms will start my reading year off with a bang. —Savanna, Assistant Editor 

Middlemarch by George Eliot

I’m putting it in writing: 2020 will be the year that I finish George Eliot’s Victorian classic Middlemarch. I have tried and failed to read this book at least three times over the past 10 years, although not for lack of enjoyment. (Books I do not enjoy languish unread with zero regrets.) Is it technology, or a potentially dwindling attention span? Whatever the reason, something takes me away just long enough for me to become disconnected from the story. Doing it justice means starting over—and I want to do justice to this one. Each time I reenter the world of smart, strong Dorothea Brooke, Eliot’s wisdom about relationships and compassion for her characters resonate on a new level. I can’t wait to see what I find there this year (including how it all turns out). —Trisha, Publisher

I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak

My friend Court has read Markus Zusak’s I Am the Messenger dozens of times. When we worked together at a bookstore, I listened to her ask customers, “Can I show you my favorite book in this whole store?” and then press it into their hands so many times, I lost count. Court is both a reader and a writer, someone who thinks long and hard about stories and what makes the good ones tick. So I don’t know why I’ve never picked up I Am the Messenger, particularly since Zusak’s best-known work, The Book Thief, is one of my all-time favorites. Who can say why we do the things we do? In a time of uncertainty, maybe I’ve just wanted to hold on to the promise of something sure: a book I know I’ll love. —Stephanie, Associate Editor

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