Tanya Hodges

<b>Her daughter's keeper</b> Some psychologists say parents who feel terrible about every bad thing that happens to their child are suffering from something called omnipotent guilt. That concept is explored with sympathy and humor in <b>A Most Uncommon Degree of Popularity</b> by Kathleen Gilles Seidel, a wife and mother with a doctorate in English literature from John Hopkins. In this modern-day tale with echoes of Jane Austen's work, Seidel pinpoints how certain social issues affect the lives of affluent people. The novel centers on four mothers who are unapologetic about not only feeling their daughters' pain, but also fighting their daughters' battles. In a world where old money collides with new money, parents compete fiercely to ensure their daughters attend the right school, appear at the right social events and make the right friends. However, these four friends quickly learn that when one gets involved in playground politics, kid stuff isn't always fun.

When Lydia Meadows trades in her career as a lawyer in Washington, D.C., to become a full-time housewife and mother, she thinks her life will be less complicated. Wrong. Her first clue that life is about to change is the moment she sees her 11-year-old daughter, Erin, and her three best friends dressed alike on the first day of sixth grade at their private school. Lydia realizes together the girls have achieved something she could never reach as a preteen girl: popularity. This should have been good news, but instead, her daughter's popularity, and what happens when it is threatened, causes Lydia to obsess over Erin's social activities and nearly ruins Lydia's relationships with her three best friends. Eventually, Lydia learns that sometimes it's necessary to allow children to fight and win their own battles. <b>A Most Uncommon Degree of Popularity</b> is written with the tenderness, affection and insight that only a mother can muster. <i>Tanya S. Hodges writes from Nashville.</i>

<b>Her daughter's keeper</b> Some psychologists say parents who feel terrible about every bad thing that happens to their child are suffering from something called omnipotent guilt. That concept is explored with sympathy and humor in <b>A Most Uncommon Degree of Popularity</b> by Kathleen Gilles Seidel, a wife and mother with a doctorate in English literature […]

Have you ever experienced something so devastating it changed not only the way you live, but also what you believe? Once Upon a Day, the third novel by writer Lisa Tucker, is a dark, passionate tale about what can happen when the course of one's life is interrupted by the events of a solitary day.

In the beginning, life was heavenly in the City of Angels for Charles Keenan, a screenwriter and director, and his beautiful bride Lucy Dobbins, a poor girl turned actress from Missouri. Their story reads like a fairy tale: Prince Charming marries Cinderella. It would seem Charles had enough fame and fortune to provide his family with a lifetime of security. But neither his money nor his power was enough to prevent violence from touching his home and family.

After their paradise is lost, Charles disappears, taking their two children, Dorothea and Jimmy, to a remote area of New Mexico, where he raises them without contact with the outside world in a mansion he calls the Sanctuary. Both children are left with only vague memories of their mother, and Jimmy is haunted by nightmares of her lying in a pool of blood, but Charles refuses to talk about what happened to her.

Nineteen years later, cabdriver Stephen Spaulding is just doing his job the day he picks up 23-year-old Dorothea at the St. Louis bus station. He has no intention of getting personal with this strange young woman wearing outdated clothes—the former doctor has avoided getting close to people since the day a tragic accident took the lives of his wife and child. However, Stephen unwittingly becomes involved in Dorothea's life as she looks for her missing brother, who left the Sanctuary in search of information about their mother. Together, they unravel the mystery surrounding her family's past, while discovering their own world of love. Tucker has a stylish, authentic way of revealing how it only takes one day for a person to lose hope or regain it.

 

Have you ever experienced something so devastating it changed not only the way you live, but also what you believe? Once Upon a Day, the third novel by writer Lisa Tucker, is a dark, passionate tale about what can happen when the course of one's life is interrupted by the events of a solitary day. […]

Can miracles occur? Is it possible to see the invisible or touch the intangible? Elizabeth Egan has never believed so. This 30-something single woman is an interior designer living in a small Irish town that she has always hated. Despite the fact that she loves to give things a good makeover, she hasn't been able to rearrange her mundane life by filling it with color, laughter or adventure. She's never tried because adding these qualities to her life could make her lose control. This organized woman deals only with facts and reality because dreams and wishes, hope and love, frivolity and spontaneity have only brought her heartache. They have caused each of her family members to fly out of her life in different directions, leaving her solely responsible for a six-year-old nephew even though she vowed never to have children.

Is there a reason for everything? Ivan certainly believes so. That's natural, given that he's an imaginary friend, only seen by children who need him. His work becomes more complicated the day he enters the life of Elizabeth's nephew, Luke. Luke isn't the problem. It's Elizabeth. Not only can she sense his presence, she is also able to see him. And he is drawn to her in a way he can't explain. Ivan can hear the pain and loneliness in her silence, so, like any good friend, he tries to show Elizabeth a way to be happy. But before she can accept his gift, she's got to believe.

Cecelia Ahern, the daughter of Ireland's prime minister, has written a romantic, whimsical and beautiful third novel. Her characters are warm and embraceable. If You Could See Me Now illustrates what can happen when we see with more than our eyes. Tanya S. Hodges writes from Nashville.

Can miracles occur? Is it possible to see the invisible or touch the intangible? Elizabeth Egan has never believed so. This 30-something single woman is an interior designer living in a small Irish town that she has always hated. Despite the fact that she loves to give things a good makeover, she hasn't been able […]

New York City is where everyone goes to make dreams come true. But beware: New York is not a place for the faint of heart. Amid the glitz and glamour, competition is fierce. The strong make it to the top, but only conquerors remain there and rule. Hold on to your Manolos. Candace Bushnell, best-selling author of Sex and the City and Trading Up, is back. Her new novel, Lipstick Jungle, is the triumphant story of three successful New York women in their early 40s who know exactly what they want: love, passion, power and a lot of money.

The moment of truth has arrived for Victory Ford, an elegant and determined fashion designer. She is awaiting the fate of her latest innovative collection during Fashion Week. However, she is also annoyed by the fact that no matter how successful she is in her profession, society will deem her a failure as long as she remains a single woman. Wendy Healy, president of Parador Pictures, has problems of her own. Life at home is chaotic. Her unconventional marriage to her stay-at-home husband is falling apart and she doesn't know how to put it back together again. Furthermore, she doesn't know if she really wants to. Beautiful Nico O'Neilly is a bona fide lioness whose no-nonsense attitude has taken her to places most people only image. Her hunger to be satisfied sexually leads her into an adulterous affair, while her hunger for power leads her into battle with the one person standing between her and her dream of being CEO in a division of her company her boss.

Bold and candid, with a philosophical bent, Lipstick Jungle just might be Bushnell's best book yet.

 

Tanya S. Hodges writes from Nashville.

New York City is where everyone goes to make dreams come true. But beware: New York is not a place for the faint of heart. Amid the glitz and glamour, competition is fierce. The strong make it to the top, but only conquerors remain there and rule. Hold on to your Manolos. Candace Bushnell, best-selling […]

Sign Up

Stay on top of new releases: Sign up for our enewsletters to receive reading recommendations in your favorite genres.

Trending Features

Sign Up

Sign up to receive reading recommendations in your favorite genres!