Susan Andersen

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A Devil in Scotland is the satisfying conclusion to Suzanne Enoch’s No Ordinary Hero series. Once upon a time in 19th-century Scotland, in a drunken rage, Callum MacCreath destroyed his relationships with his brother, Ian, and his best friend, Rebecca. Upon discovering they were about to become engaged, Callum demanded she marry him instead and ranted about the dangers of the partnership Ian was about to enter with Rebecca’s father. Rebecca firmly refused him, and his beloved brother ordered Callum to leave and never come back.

Callum spent the past 10 years growing up and building a business in America. But when he learns that his brother has drowned under mysterious circumstances, he ends his exile. Callum realizes now that Ian was justified in banishing him, but he also knows he wasn’t wrong about everything he spewed the last time he saw his brother. He returns to Scotland with a heart bent on revenge. And if those old feelings for Becca are still there, well, he’ll work around them.

Marrying Ian was the smart and practical thing to do, but in Becca’s weaker moments, she still remembers the feelings she once harbored for his younger brother. She has just begun to emerge from mourning not only Ian’s death but also her father’s. Then Callum, whom she believed to have died during the past decade, appears on her doorstep to take his rightful place as the new Lord Geiry. He’s steadier—and stronger—than the wild and reckless boy she remembers. Yet he still inspires the same sneaky fire in her heart that he did as an 18-year-old. But can he give up his thirst for revenge?

Enoch always displays a deft touch with family relationships, and A Devil in Scotland is no exception. The details of how Rebecca’s properties and inheritance are handled are particularly insightful. Enoch’s characters leap from the page, especially Callum, who evolves from a man willing to die for justice to a true hero who seeks a solution that won’t leave mayhem in his wake.

Callum and Rebecca grab the reader’s heart in this rich, sexy and nuanced tale of love and intrigue.

A Devil in Scotland is the satisfying conclusion to Suzanne Enoch’s No Ordinary Hero series. Once upon a time in 19th-century Scotland, in a drunken rage, Callum MacCreath destroyed his relationships with his brother, Ian, and his best friend, Rebecca. Upon discovering they were about to become engaged, Callum demanded she marry him instead and ranted about the dangers of the partnership Ian was about to enter with Rebecca’s father. Rebecca firmly refused him, and his beloved brother ordered Callum to leave and never come back.

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Miranda Gabriel is back in Blue Moon Harbor, the town she fled after dropping out of high school. It’s the last place she ever expected to return to, but she has a 2-year-old daughter who deserves better than what Miranda has been able to give her so far. So Miranda returns to the tiny town and to her brother, Aaron, the only person she unequivocally knows she can count on. Once back in Blue Moon Harbor, Miranda discovers she’s inheriting Aaron’s new fiancée’s family right along with him. Miranda and Aaron were given short shrift in the functional family department, so she doesn’t have the first idea how to interact with her new family-in-law. She doesn’t plan to stick around very long, anyhow. She just needs to get back on her feet, then she’s returning to Vancouver where she belongs.

Local veterinarian Luke Chandler is a lifelong resident of Blue Moon Harbor. He married his high school sweetheart, and they planned to grow old together. But the day their twin boys were born, he lost the love of his life, and he’s been raising his sons on his own these past four years. Then one day, he walks into the local toy store and runs into the no-longer-Goth, grown-up version of the girl who fascinated him back in high school. Luke decides on the spot that maybe the time is finally right for him to get to know another woman. Miranda is a harder sell, but Luke perseveres until she agrees to meet him for a cup of coffee. And little by little thereafter, Miranda is drawn deeper into his orbit.

Susan Fox pens a page-turner of second chances and self-discovery in the second book of her Blue Moon Harbor series. Too many books hinge on a problem that one good conversation would resolve, but Miranda and Luke are excellent communicators who actually discuss the problems separating them, even as their individual issues threaten to keep them from getting their hearts’ desires. Their gratifying struggle will keep you turning the pages of Come Home with Me far into the early hours of the morning to learn how they ultimately score their happily ever after.

Susan Fox pens a page-turner of second chances and self-discovery in the second book of her Blue Moon Harbor series.

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To anyone who asks, Mick Branson is back in the small Wyoming town of Mustang Creek to surprise his friend Slater Carson with a Christmas Day presentation of Slater’s latest documentary. But he also wants to see Raine McCall. There is no denying they are far from each other’s usual type. Yet Mick hasn’t been able to put her out of his mind since the last time he was in town.

Raine is content with her life. She’s self-employed, has a daughter she adores and is good friends with her kid’s father, as well of a decent portion of the rest of Mustang Creek’s admittedly small population. The last thing she needs is a hotshot movie exec to show her all the things she’s supposedly been missing. But Mick isn’t like that. He seems to fit in with her group of friends, her daughter likes him, and he has never made her feel less than the glamorous Hollywood women she is pretty sure he’s accustomed to. And god knows they have chemistry to spare. So when he requests a meeting to discuss a possible job offer for her, she agrees to see him. She even invites him to share a Christmas Eve dinner with her.

A Snow Country Christmas is heaven-sent for Linda Lael Miller’s multitude of fans and is sure to make a fan of those who have not yet had the pleasure of reading her books. Miller fills her stories with rich settings and characters so well-rounded, they cause a reader to feel as if they could be your neighbor, your best friend or the man of your dreams brought down to earth. You might want to add A Snow Country Christmas to Santa’s list, because this is a perfect stocking stuffer of a book!

 

Susan Andersen is a New York Times bestselling author of 25 romance and romantic-suspense novels.

A Snow Country Christmas is heaven sent for Linda Lael Miller’s multitude of fans and is sure to make a fan of those who have not yet had the pleasure of reading her books. Miller fills her stories with rich settings and characters so well-rounded, they cause a reader to feel as if they could be your neighbor, your best friend or the man of your dreams brought down to earth. You might want to add A Snow Country Christmas to Santa’s list, my friends, because this is a perfect stocking stuffer of a book!

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Braden Montgomery is a game warden in small-town Hotchkiss, Colorado, and has structured his life exactly the way he wants it. His job lets him spend a lot of time outdoors, and the only female he has to tolerate these days—never mind cares to have warming his bed—is his dog Charley. Given Braden’s history with a cheating ex-fiancée, bachelorhood suits him just fine. But then a Texas girl who stars in a televised hunting show and is best known for her short shorts, cleavage and pink camouflage bursts into his life, smelling like strawberries and making his dormant libido rear its head.

Amber Regan’s show is circling the drain, and she’s in search of the perfect location to film an elk hunt she hopes will haul the program back to its glory days. She knows exactly what Warden Montgomery thinks of her—and doesn’t particularly care. Well, except maybe for the part where something about the guy makes her heart beat in Texas Two Step Swing tempo. She knows what a fantastic hunter she is. She grew up hunting with her uncle and if people don’t like the girly wardrobe she often does it in, too bad.

Ready for Wild was my first Liora Blake book, but it won’t be my last. Blake writes with heart, humor and sizzling sexiness, presenting her readers with characters and situations we can sink our teeth into and believe in. Braden and Amber felt like people I would happily hang out with. They didn’t let misunderstandings stand—they talked things through, leaping off the page as fully realized adults. I predict they will leave you rooting as enthusiastically for their hard won happily ever after as I did.

Liora Blake's Ready for Wild is full of heart, humor and sizzling sexiness.

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New York Times bestselling author Susan Wiggs’ new novel, Map of the Heart, opens with what should have been just another day in the life of former adrenaline junkie Camille Palmer. In the wake of her husband Jace’s horrendous death, Camille has constructed a stifling, safe life for her daughter, Julie, and herself. Years have passed since Jace died, but Camille has been so busy hanging onto his memory and trying to wrap her ninth grader in figurative cotton batting that she’s completely overlooked the signs that Julie is in trouble.

Even once events force Camille to realize she’s smothering her child, she can’t let go of the fear she’s lived with since watching her husband die. She resists getting sucked into her father Henry and Julie’s excitement when the arrival of a mysterious package gives them a glimpse into their family’s past, even as it raises more questions than provides answers. Camille reluctantly accompanies her family to Henry’s hometown in the south of France. Conversations there with old acquaintances, as well as concerted attempts to unravel the mysteries of her father's childhood, eventually lead the family back to the final years of World War II. And with the help of the one man she hasn’t been able to ignore, a retired Naval officer and now historian who specializes in repatriating the missing remains of soldiers, Camille may find a far brighter future than she ever envisioned for herself.

Wiggs seamlessly weaves a multigenerational story that will make you laugh, make you cry and leave you with a sigh of satisfaction as you turn the final page.

Susan Wiggs seamlessly weaves a multigenerational story that will make you laugh, make you cry and leave you with a sigh of satisfaction as you turn the final page.

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New York Times bestselling author Maisey Yates adds another entry to her wildly popular Copper Ridge series with Down Home Cowboy.

Cain Donnelly has returned to Copper Ridge with his teenage daughter, Violet. A few years back, his wife walked out on both of them, upending their lives. Since then, Violet has changed dramatically. Cain truly fears if they don’t get a change of scenery pronto, he will lose his daughter as well. Living with his estranged brothers isn’t what he planned for his life, but he’s willing to put up with anything if it will help him get back his sweet little girl.

Alison Davis has worked like crazy to rebuild her life into something she can be proud of. The entire town knows her as a victim of domestic abuse, but she is more than that now. She owns the town bakery and helps other women who find themselves in difficult situations. Then one night she looks across the local bar and sees a cowboy—and it’s instant, make-your-hair-smoke lust. But the following morning, she discovers he’s her newest employee’s father.

Cain can’t believe the woman with the great ass he’d admired just the night before is Violet’s boss. There goes his fantasy of maybe having sex again sometime this decade. Still, when he sees the ease with which Alison relates to his difficult daughter, he puts his libido aside and asks for her help. He knows he’s not a good communicator at the best of times. But maybe Alison can teach him some tools to regain the easy relationship he once had with Violet. Alison agrees to help and a short while later, she offers an addendum to their agreement: no-strings sex.

Yates crafts a sexy, multilayered story about the power of family and how the walls between two damaged people must fall down if they are to have any hope of moving forward. Pull out the fans and the Kleenex, my friends, because you’ll need both.

New York Times bestselling author Maisey Yates adds another entry to her wildly popular Copper Ridge series with Down Home Cowboy.

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The late Jo Beverley, a New York Times bestselling author, has left us a parting gift—her final Regency historical, Merely a Marriage. The year is 1817, and Lady Ariana Boxstall has grown increasingly anxious since the Regent’s only child, Princess Charlotte, died in childbirth. If death can claim a woman so young, Ariana fears for her brother Norris, the Earl of Langston, given all the risks he takes in his Corinthian lifestyle. She feels it’s imperative Norris take a wife and quickly present an heir to secure the succession. Should it pass to their drunken, gambling-mad uncle, their mother’s life will be left in shambles. Norris, however, has no desire to marry at this time and shows no sign of changing his mind—until he determines that if she is married by the end of the year, he will follow suit by the end of January.

Putting herself in the ton’s sights is the last thing Ariana wants to do. She is inordinately tall, and her debut when she was 16 was a disaster. Yet, reluctantly, she agrees. Her mother accompanies her to London where their hostess Lady Cawle will usher Ariana through the unofficial marriage mart. The first thing Lady Cawle hands Ariana is a written list of possible husbands she has arranged for Ariana to meet, including the Earl of Kynaston, who broke Ariana’s heart eight years ago.

When Titus Frederick Delacorte, the Earl of Kynaston, met Ariana years ago, he was the toast of the town. Then life introduced him to heartbreak and taught him in the worst way possible that no one’s life is forever golden. He has sworn off love, but being thrown together with Ariana makes staying steadfast to his avowed oath increasingly difficult.

With trademark authority and vivid characterization, Jo Beverley paints a stunning picture of aristocratic Regency London life as Ariana and Kynaston’s inability to stay away from each other courts scandal during a countrywide mourning period.

The late Jo Beverly, a New York Times bestselling author, has left us a parting gift—her final Regency historical, Merely a Marriage. The year is 1817, and Lady Ariana Boxstall has been growing increasingly anxious during the two weeks since the Regent’s only child, Princess Charlotte, died in childbirth.

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Never Trust a Pirate, the seventh book in Valerie Bowman’s Playful Brides series, is a delicious mix of intrigue and red-hot romance.

Twins Cade and Rafe Cavendish grew up rough in Seven Dials, London. But while Rafe was bestowed a viscountcy by the Prince Regent for his work during the war and married the sister of an earl, Cade has spent the past decade doing something decidedly different. He knows he’s rumored to be the infamous pirate Black Fox and shrugs at being titled the family black sheep—hell, if the black wool fits. He is pleased his brother found happiness, but Cade knows better than to think love is for the likes of him. He only plans to be in town long enough to get the information for which he came. Then he’s in the wind.

A former heiress who was left penniless after her parents died, Miss Danielle LaCrosse is now Lady Daphne Cavendish’s new maid. She arrives at the Cavendish household with secrets and an agenda of her own. Yet even as she pursues the latter, Danielle finds herself getting drawn into the warmth and welcome of both the servants with whom she works and Lady Daphne, who is like no member of the ton Danielle has ever known. As for the viscount’s brother, Cade—well, every time the two of them run into each other, they generate some serious sparks. While both know it’s the last thing they need—for their emotional well-being and the agendas that brought them to this destination—they cannot seem to stay away from each other.

Bowman pens a fun, fast page-turner of a romance, filled with characters that communicate even as they struggle to trust each other. For readers who like a soupçon of suspense with their romance, this is a book to keep you guessing.

Never Trust a Pirate, the seventh book in Valerie Bowman’s Playful Brides series, is a delicious mix of intrigue and red-hot romance.

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New York Times bestseller Julia London’s second book in her Highland Grooms series hits the ground running. Widow Daisy Bristol, Lady Chatwick, is under a deadline to remarry, forced into matrimony by the terms of her late husband’s will. When she receives a letter from her long-lost first love, it gives her hope that, if wed she must, this time she might do so with genuine affection. She flees with her son to the family holding in Scotland, hoping to buy time until her long-ago suitor can get back to England. The first Scot she meets is a brusque, imposing man who introduces himself only as Arrendale.

Cailean MacKenzie, laird of Arrendale, doesn’t want any Londoners in his glen, but Lady Chatwick is hard to ignore. She’s unlike the usual Sassenach: He comes across her barefoot and in bedclothes, her hair uncombed. Then he spies her once again, dirtied, sweaty and sporting a bleeding scratch from clearing her own garden. And she flirts with him with bold eyes and an even bolder, sassy mouth. He doesn’t want to be interested, but his heart isn’t listening.

How is Daisy not supposed to notice when Cailean wears his plaid, displaying bare knees and a peek of his powerful thighs? He has told her in no uncertain terms that he’s not interested in her, yet a curious friendship begins to unfold between them. And soon, even that line becomes blurred as each is drawn more and more fiercely to the other.

Then Daisy’s first love, Captain Robert Spivey, arrives on the scene. Not only is he an old enemy of Cailean’s, but Spivey is a cold fish whom Cailean knows will kill the very passion that makes Daisy the woman she is. So Cailean risks his own safety to assure the union between Daisy and Spivey will never take place.

Julia London pens a lush, sweeping story of love, loyalty and cultures clashing that will keep readers glued to their seats, hearts in throats, as they turn pages at lightning speed to make sure Daisy and Cailean get their just deserts: the happily ever after both so richly deserve.

New York Times bestseller Julia London’s second book in her Highland Grooms series hits the ground running. Widow Daisy Bristol, Lady Chatwick, is under a deadline to remarry, forced into matrimony by the terms of her late husband’s will. When she receives a letter from her long-lost first love, it gives her hope that, if wed she must, this time she might do so with genuine affection.
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Hear that sucking sound? That’s New York Times bestseller Jennifer Probst pulling me into Any Time, Any Place, the second book in her Billionaire Builders series.

A tragic event in Raven Hawthorne’s life sent her spinning out of control for several long, miserable years. But she has since rebuilt her life and is feeling good about it—until the Pierce brothers stroll into her pub. As far as Raven’s concerned, the blame for her messy life can be laid directly at the Pierce family’s collective feet. But after initially throwing the brothers out of her bar, she sucks it up, allows them back in and treats them with cool professionalism. Then Dalton, the youngest of the three and a known player when it comes to the ladies, starts vying for her attention. She shuts him down over and over again. However, Raven is not a woman willing to lie to herself, and she can’t deny that they generate some serious chemistry.

Ordinarily, if a woman shuts him down, Dalton shrugs and moves along to the next. But there is something about Raven that keeps drawing him back for more of her entertaining verbal barbs. He doesn’t doubt for a moment that she feels the same sexual spark he does—but damned if the woman isn’t willing to ignore it. Dalton is looking for a reason to spend more time with her, and since he’s truly enamored with Raven’s battered antique bar, he offers to restore it.

As they spend more and more time in daily contact, those sparks begin to fly. But Raven has a secret that involves the Pierces. Only time will tell if it will kill the feelings growing between them—or restore her and Dalton’s broken pieces.

Any Time, Any Place is a warm, sexy, gritty blockbuster of a book. Probst composes characters and situations with a nimble dexterity and believability that left this reader eager to read more of her work.

Susan Andersen is a New York Times bestselling author of 24 romance and romantic suspense novels.

Hear that sucking sound? That’s New York Times bestseller Jennifer Probst pulling me into Any Time, Any Place, the second book in her Billionaire Builders series.
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So you love brainy American heroines and the stalwart, strapping English heroes who love them? Then this is the book for you. USA Today bestselling author Maya Rodale wraps up her Keeping Up With The Cavendishes series with Lady Claire Is All That.

When her brother James shockingly inherits a dukedom, it's Claire who convinces her siblings to give England a chance. She possibly has an agenda. OK, fine, she is fervent about math and numbers, and this is her only way to meet the Duke of Ashbrook. She has dreamed of telling him how much she loves the papers he’s written for the Royal Society. Claire longs for the opportunity to discuss his difference machine with him and offer a few possibilities she has worked out to enhance his analytical machine even further. She certainly doesn’t desire crossing an ocean to attend silly balls. She will, however, put up with them for her siblings’ sake.

Maximillian Frederick DeVere, Lord Fox, took a hit to his pride when his perfect-for-him fiancée eloped with an actor. Still, he’s a competitive man. So when a comrade insists no one can transform Lady Claire, given the rapidity with which she has been driving prospective grooms away by the droves with all her talk of math, Max promptly bets he can. He even goes so far as to wager his beloved dog. Almost as quickly, he wonders what the hell he was thinking. He loves all things physical and he’s a social creature. God knows he doesn’t understand a fraction of what Lady Claire talks about. Yet he is genuinely drawn to the passion she displays rhapsodizing over the very topics he fails to understand.

Claire finds Lord Fox a mental lightweight. But he certainly is physically appealing. And he manages what she was unable to do for herself: He introduces her to the very Duke she’s been dying to meet, then escorts her to the Royal Society to talk with likeminded mathematicians. And before she knows it, Fox is introducing her to a passion that owes nothing to math.

Maya Rodale has penned a quirky novel peopled with unique characters and situations not often seen in historical romance.

So you love brainy American heroines and the stalwart, strapping English heroes who love them? Then this is the book for you.

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